HOW CAN TANGIBLE EXPERIENCES PROMPT CONVERSATIONS ABOUT PREFERENCES FOR DIGITAL PRIVACY?

05-The-Exchange-in-Action_BW_crop1170x400

[ design & research lead / activity facilitator ⇄ working with DoUC in collaboration with RADICAL NORMS ]

Designing Privacy is an exploratory research project that aimed to expose and explore unconsidered or unmet digital privacy requirements through tangible activities prompting unstructured conversations.

The project started by bringing together interdisciplinary experts to map the landscape of digital privacy today. This led to a framework of considerations for digital exchange. This framework guided the design of an interactive pop-up installation—The [terms & conditions of] Exchange.

The Exchange was hosted at multiple events including the Toronto Public Library’s Privacy Fair, Folkemødet (The People's Political Festival), and TODO 2018. The [terms & conditions of] Exchange was selected by an independent jury to be one of ten Festival Features at Toronto Design Offsite Festival in 2018.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
TPL_square

MAPPING DIGITAL PRIVACY

panel

The project launched with a discussion between diverse professionals who deal with issues of privacy from different perspectives, including law, design, academia, backend security, and Open Government.

Synthesizing the outcomes of this conversation, I documented the topics and examples identified by each panelist, and summarized the outcomes through a framework which attempts to map the factors that contribute to digital exchange.

This framework is intended to help guide questions about privacy in a digital exchange, not to provide answers.

Framework_Franklin-Gothic-framework

CONSENT

How much information or exchange an individual is willing to contribute through online engagement with a digital platform.

REGULATION

The parameters, as defined by a governing body, of what is considered to be permissible engagement within digital platforms.

BOUNDARY

Where Consent and Regulation overlap defines the space in which entities engage and exchange digitally.

VALUE

The exchange within this boundary determines value which is not only economic, but also social or systemic. This can be negative, positive, or both depending on context.

CONSEQUENCE

Over time, mapping the potential changes of boundary and value can help inform action in the present and the creation of scenarios for the future.

DESIGNING A TANGIBLE EXPERIENCE

The Activities

To test the framework, we designed The [terms & conditions of] Exchange—a pop-up kiosk hosting a series of tangible activities correlated to each of the framework’s components.

Framework_Franklin-Gothic-exchange
TEST YOUR LUCK
What types of information are participants uncomfortable sharing in person?

Activity: Play 5 truths & a lie with a "fortune teller"
Data: name, phone number, birthday, relationship status, etc. (information commonly used to sign up for digital services)

TEST YOUR STRENGTH
Are participants willing to provide their signature after listening to a full Terms and Conditions?

Activity: Listen to an audio recording of a real T&C for as long as possible
Data: name, email, birthday, signature

THE EXCHANGE
Are participants willing to exchange their personal information for a chance to win a prize?

Activity: Exchange your info for tokens to play the game of skill (and a chance to shred your data)

TEST YOUR SKILL
Is a game of luck a fair exchange for a chance to shred your data?

Activity: Play a classic game of luck: Plinko! If you win we’ll shred your data (all participant information submitted was actually shredded)

GRAND PRIZE
Leave participants with a token to remind them of their experience.

Activity: All participants can keep the small plastic token they used to play Plinko as thank you for participating.

The Kiosk

To be easily transported and quickly installed (and produced on a minimal budget) the kiosk is built off of a modified drywall scaffolding frame. Many interactive components are analog (paper slips, cards, and hand shredder) in order to maintain the tangible experience of the kiosk.

KIOSK-01_1200x1200
KIOSK-02_1200x1200
KIOSK-03_1200x1200
KIOSK-04_1200x1200

THE OUTCOME

At each pop-up event, we found that although each activity took between 2-14 minutes participants often stayed afterward to continue in conversation. These discussions were often about their own experiences with digital privacy or to talk through the details of The Exchange.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

In January 2019, I was invited to co-present this project at the DesignTO Symposium: Unlocking the Future of Work.